Views on pop culture through my eyes

Posts tagged ‘tartan’

Top 5 Reasons My Kilt Rocks

Recently there was a blog post blasting Utilikilts by someone calling themselves Geekenstein. This is my answer back to what he posted. This guy definitely has too much time on his hands. It has always been my philosophy that I don’t judge another person’s happiness. Different people like different things, plain and simple. It doesn’t make them evil or stupid — it’s just them expressing themselves. And I don’t have to get it. As long as they are happy, then I am all for self expression.

5. You Are Now “That Weird Guy”
I take that as a compliment quite frankly. I wear my Utilikilt everywhere: the grocery store, the movies, church, parties, the mall, amusement parks, hiking, nights on the town, house parties, concerts, and nightclubs. It does not make me “socially ackward.” In fact, it is such that it is a great conversation starter. I have had more conversations and compliments from strangers than I can keep track of.

You say you get the idea of not wearing pants. Have you ever tried a kilt? Utilikilts are comfortable as hell. I like my naked time at home too, but I can’t be naked in public. But I can wear a kilt in public.

4. First Impressions Really Are Everything
I agree with a lot of what is said here. As much as I love my kilts, I would never wear one to an interview. I would have to know for certaint that the person I was meeting with would be wearing one too (like if I met Marc Andrews of Disney-Pixar on Kilted Fridays). That is the only way I could ever see wearing one to an interview. They are for me on MY time.

Kilts can fit many occasions — you can dress them up, you can dress them down. Put on a dress shirt and tie, and you are ready for a dressy night on the town. Put on a T-shirt and some hiking boots and you are ready to hit the trails. Who says we should all dress a certain way? Who are you to question what fits me and makes me feel good? And if they call me the “kilt guy” — I would be perfectly fine with that.

I have pictures of myself in my kilt at work, and have worn it on casual day a few times too. So I am slowly educating and enlightening my coworkers to them.

3. So Is Networking, the World Runs on Who You Know
Your argument is so stupid here. I agree that who you know is just as important as what you know. Why would a friend even mention “He does like to wear a kilt, though”? This is NOT even relevant to the job! And if a person did this with the intention of having you eliminated from consideration, then he was never a friend to begin with.

I wear a kilt because it fits me. I look good in one, and I feel comfortable in one. Plus I rock it too. It takes a real man to wear one. One who is secure in his manhood, and not afraid to march to the beat of his own drum. I don’t wear a kilt because I like my balls to dangle. Now you are fetishizing it. I wear it for the reasons I mentioned. I know enough of when and where to wear something under the kilt.

As much as I wear kilts, I don’t have a network of kilt lovers in my social circle. And I have never felt that I am an ostracized minority for wearing one. My social circles are made up of fantastic, fun, loving people who like me for me, not cause I wear a kilt, but because I am a good person and I am fun to be around.

2. What Do You Want to Do With Your Life?
I want to live my live to the fullest, and explore my creativity in as many areas as I can. I want to give back to the community and be a positive role model. Where I work now, does not have anything against wearing kilts in their employee handbook. I asked Human Resources, and I was given a thumbs up for casual days.

I would really be limiting myself if I chose jobs by whether I could wear a kilt all the time or not. That has never been part of my thought process when I am considering different job offers. I always try to keep my skillset as big as possible, not because I like kilts, but because that is the nature of working today. Employees are being asked to take on more and more responsibilities and to keep up with the latest changes in technology and processes.

1. Seriously, my Utilikilt Rocks! (And F*** Yourself)
Wearing a kilt is not a fashion faux pas in my book. It says to the world, hey, I don’t give a f*** what other people think, I choose to be ME. I choose to question society, question the norm. I know for me, when I embraced it, that is when things got better in my life. I dress for me, not the masses.

I don’t agree with the statement “Utilikilts took a traditional garb and perverted it.” Perverted it how? To me, they took something old, and made it more modern and functional for today’s world. They took something that was associated with Scottish culture, and made it more universal. I bet there are a lot of people who wear Utilikilts, who don’t have any Scottish ancestry at all. They just like the comfort, styling, look and feel of wearing them. Again, the writer emphasizes the balls dangling thing. I think he has an obsession with this.

What I have found, is that wearing a Utilikilt has gotten me more into my Scottish heritage. I have 4 Utilikilts, but only recently did I buy a Scottish kilt. It looks cool, and I hope to wear it to some formal/dressy events. I find a Utilikilt fits more my everyday lifestyle. It is very comfortable, and light-weight. And I know that I rock it!

KiltManinSoCal is a Los Angeles-based writer and designer. Be sure to check out the latest T-Shirts for sale here, including Marriage Equality and  Rock the Kilt lines. They make great gifts for friends, family and loved ones.

Top Ten Places to Wear a Kilt

As long time readers of this blog, you should know that one of my favorite items of clothing is my kilt. I am often seen around town wearing it. Yes, it took some getting used to… but now I barely give it a second thought when I put it on. So hear are the Top Ten places to wear a kilt:

Tartan kilt

  1. Concerts: You can be as dressy or playful with it as you want. I have worn it to fancy Christmas concerts (with sweater, shirt and tie), and to big arena rock shows like Lady GaGa too (with my mesh shirt). Great for dancing, and shows that you like to have a bit of a edge too.
  2. Nightclub: Did I mention it is confortable? And again shows off a man’s legs nicely and gets people guessing about what you are or are not wearing under it. I have heard of plenty of women buying drinks for guys in kilts. (Somebody’s got to be into that… now if it was cute guys… now that’s another story)
  3. Dinner Party: Dressier than jeans, but not as dressy as slacks, with a nice shirt and tie, you will be good to go. A great conversation starter, people take notice and love to ask what it’s all about. Hey, it’s comfortable, I’m artsy… I’m Scottish, etc.
  4. Wedding: Only did this once, and it was a gay wedding too. But it was a nice warm day, and I made sure that I coordinated the outfit with my partners. If they ever bring back gay marriage in California, I want to be married in one.
  5. The Mall: This I do on the regular…. Window shopping, going out to the movies/dinner, maybe even doing some real shopping too. I look good, and know that I make it work.
    (more…)

Scottish Festival Long Beach 2012

I attended my first Scottish Festival this past weekend in Long Beach, CA at the Queen Mary. I have long been a big supporter of kilts (Real Men Do Wear Kilts), so why not explore my culture with a few friends in tow? I am actually Scottish on my mother’s side. The family name is Moir, which is part of the Gordon clan.

The festival had booths selling Scottish/Celtic items everything from kilts to shortbread cookies to teddy bears and jewelry. They also had booths for the different clans of Scotland as well as other upcoming Scottish Festivals in the Southern California area. Plus Scottish meat pies, haggis, ales and whiskey too.

Throughout the day, there were athletics going on, as well as highland dancing, pipe (bag pipes) and drum demonstrations, and even a dart competition. The athletics competition consisted of the following:

  • Caber toss: This is the big event, it looks like they are trying to toss a telephone pole. There was a memorable scene with this in the movie “Made of Honor.” A long pole or log is stood upright and hoisted by the competitor who balances it vertically. Then the competitor runs forward attempting to toss it in such a way that it turns end over end with the upper end striking the ground first. Competitors are judged on how closely their throws approximate the ideal 12 o’clock toss on an imaginary clock.
  • Stone put: This event is similar to the modern-day shot put as seen in the Olympic Games. Instead of a steel shot, a large stone of variable weight is often used. The stone is put with one hand with the stone resting cradled in the neck until the moment of release.
  • Scottish hammer throw: This event is similar to the hammer throw as seen in modern-day track and field competitions, though with some differences. In the Scottish event, a round metal ball is attached to a wire and handle. With the feet in a fixed position, the hammer is whirled about one’s head and thrown for distance over the shoulder. (We actually didn’t see this, as it was held elsewhere in the venue).
  • Weight throw, also known as the weight for distance event. The weights are made of metal and have a handle attached either directly or by means of a chain. The implement is thrown using one hand only, but otherwise using any technique. Usually a spinning technique is employed. The longest throw wins.
  • Weight over the bar, also known as weight for height. The athletes attempt to toss a weight with an attached handle over a horizontal bar using only one hand. Each athlete is allowed three attempts at each height. Successful clearance of the height allows the athlete to advance into the next round at a greater height.
  • Sheaf toss: A bundle of straw (the sheaf) and wrapped in a burlap bag is tossed vertically with a pitchfork over a raised bar much like that used in pole vaulting. The progression and scoring of this event is similar to the Weight Over The Bar.

We also watched some of the drum major competition. They had to walk across an area, doing their best march along with twirling their batons and striking certain poses. My lover called the whole process “doing the pimp walk”  — cause you had to have a certain swag, attitude and posture as you did the routine.

Overall, we had a good time, saw some cute guys in kilts and enjoyed some Scottish culture. I would definitely recommend this event to other people. The Queen Mary was also available for people to tour as part of their Scottish Festival admission. We spent some time touring the engine room as well as the upper deck.

Spice69man is a Los Angeles-based writer and designer. Be sure to check out the latest T-Shirts for sale here, including the Real Men Wear Kilts line. They make great gifts for Easter and birthdays.

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